1 Akinogis

Essays On Franklin D Roosevelt And The New Deal

In the summer of 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Governor of New York, was nominated as the presidential candidate of the Democratic Party. In his acceptance speech, Roosevelt addressed the problems of the depression by telling the American people that, "I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people." In the election that took place in the fall of 1932, Roosevelt won by a landslide.

The New Deal Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration in March 1933. Based on the assumption that the power of the federal government was needed to get the country out of the depression, the first days of Roosevelt's administration saw the passage of banking reform laws, emergency relief programs, work relief programs, and agricultural programs. Later, a second New Deal was to evolve; it included union protection programs, the Social Security Act, and programs to aid tenant farmers and migrant workers. Many of the New Deal acts or agencies came to be known by their acronyms. For example, the Works Progress Administration was known as the WPA, while the Civilian Conservation Corps was known as the CCC. Many people remarked that the New Deal programs reminded them of alphabet soup.

By 1939, the New Deal had run its course. In the short term, New Deal programs helped improve the lives of people suffering from the events of the depression. In the long run, New Deal programs set a precedent for the federal government to play a key role in the economic and social affairs of the nation.

To search for more documents in American Memory related to New Deal programs and agencies, use such terms as Works Progress Administration, Civilian Conservation Corps, Public Works Administration, Farm Security Administration, and the National Recovery Administration.
top of page

Show More

When Franklin D. Roosevelt accepted the Democratic nomination for presidency in 1932, he promised the American people a “New Deal.” The New Deal was President Roosevelt’s program to deal with the deepening Great Depression. On March 9, 1933, exactly five days after his inauguration, FDR kept his promise he made to the people and began implementing his New Deal. The purpose of the New Deal was to relieve the economic hardship, to help millions of Americans, and to solve the unemployment problem. However, after the New Deal was implemented, the economic system worsened through increased inflation and heavy deficit. Millions of farmers were left destitute, businesses failed, and the unemployment rate rose drastically. As a result, FDR’s…show more content…

Approximately six million pigs were killed in 1933. When farmers took their land out of production according to government regulation, thousands of black sharecroppers and tenant farmers were thrown off their land. As a result of AAA, farm production declined and many more people were hungry, jobless, and homeless. Another New Deal program was the National Recovery Act (NRA). Its stated purpose was to regulate business, develop price codes, set wages and manage working condition and schedules. The result was that the shorter hours and higher wages increased business costs and forced businesses to reduce staff. After the NRA was implemented, unemployment rose to thirteen million. In order to finance all of Roosevelt’s government projects, the federal government resorted to heavy deficit financing. In 1934, Roosevelt’s budget projected an income of three billion and an expense of ten billion. The national debt grew from $22 ½ billion in 1933 to $40 ½ billion in 1939. To deal with the growing government need of money, taxes were raised in 1933, 1934, and again in 1935. The restricted economic growth lengthened the depression. All FDR’s plans failed, and there were more American people unemployed in 1940 than in 1932. During FDR’s twelve year term, he implemented numerous government policies and programs, the purpose of which was to benefit and aid the American people and the economy. The Emergency Banking Relief Act was

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *